Posts Tagged ‘for sale’

Sign Proof“So what will it cost us to secure your services?”  One of the top questions that I receive.  The answer may vary depending on the services you request.  For the purposes of this 3 part series, I will let you in on Renter’s Agent, Buyer’s Agent, and Seller’s Agent pay.  According to the 2013 National Association of Realtors Member Profile, “In 2012, the typical agent had 12 residential transaction sides – up from the previous year when the typical agent had 10 transaction sides.”  Traditionally, the real estate industry is completely commission based.  Most of the time, a Realtor works under the supervision of a broker unless they are a broker themselves.  In that case the broker may have their own company or work with a large, well-known company like Keller Williams for example.  There is also the option for a Realtor to work on a team within a larger company.  All of these folks require payment.  So realistically, on one real estate transaction, there is the potential for the commission to be split 6 different ways before it is all said and done.  Let’s take a look at the Seller’s Agent…

The Seller’s Agent.  In the very beginning, the commission percentage for the whole transaction is agreed upon between the seller and the selling agent when the listing agreement is completed.  Generally, the selling agent agrees to split that commission with the buyer’s agent, and that amount is noted in the listing agreement, as well as on the listing that is put on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS).  The listing agreement also details the length of time that the agent will represent the seller, and any other pertinent information like bonuses to the Buyer’s Agent, etc.  The listing agent is in a unique position.  The idea is to get the home in great condition and priced right from day one.  However, despite the agent’s best efforts, sometimes the house doesn’t sell right away.  If the listing agreement expires, and the seller decides not to continue listing with the same agent, that agent may never receive any form of compensation for their time and effort towards marketing the home.

But they put a sign in the yard, place the listing on the MLS and then sit back and wait to get paid, right?  Some agents do.  That’s why I am hoping that you have done your research and chosen an agent who is willing to go the extra mile… like me!  Once you crunch the numbers, it will look like a LOT of money that you are paying to be represented.  Back to the “sign in the yard” question.  Everything (almost) is negotiable in real estate, so it is important to understand what comes with that commission percentage.  The agent may provide a professionally recorded video tour, a home inspection, color flyers, your home may be featured on their website, a lockbox for easy access, coordinated showings and feedback, open houses and all different types of advertising.  Or they might not include any of those things.

So how is a Seller’s Agent paid?  Once a contract is accepted, financing is arranged, and the transaction closes, the seller’s agent gets paid.  The realtor commission agreed upon in the listing agreement is split between the Seller’s Agent and the Buyer’s Agent.  Then, as I spoke of above, this is split with the agent’s broker, and may even be split with the agent’s team if they are on one.

Here is an example:

The price of the home is $100,000.  The commission is 6%; 3% to the Seller’s Agent, and 3% to the Buyer’s Agent.  The brokerage split is 70/30.  The royalties to the company are 5%.  And then the split to the team is 40%.  The paychecks may look like this;  $900 to the brokerage, $150 to the company, and $780 to the team.  That potentially leaves $1170 to the Seller’s Agent before taxes.

Agent John Doe said that he will only charge me 4% commission, so I’m going to go with him.  I’m sure you understand saving a few bucks, don’t you?  I do understand the initial “let me save as much money as I can” feeling.  But if you step back and look at the bigger picture, taking that 4% could cost you more in the long run.  Considering that the commission is split between the Buyer’s Agent and Seller’s Agent like we talked about above, is the agent likely to split the commission equally down the middle?  Probably not!  The reason behind this is because the Buyer’s Agent may be accustomed to receiving a pretty consistent percentage on the sales that they help produce.  We’ll say 3%.  If the 4% is split down the middle, that means the Buyer’s Agent only gets 2% when on most other homes they may get 3%.  That may mean the difference in showing another home (or many other homes) over yours.  So, say the Seller’s Agent agrees to give the Buyer’s Agent the 3%, but there is only 4% to work with.  That leaves the Seller’s Agent 1%.  Let’s see what that looks like in numbers…

The price of the home is $100,000.  The commission is 4%; 1% to the Seller’s Agent, and 3% to the Buyer’s Agent.  The brokerage split is 70/30.  The royalties to the company are 5%.  And then the split to the team is 40%.  The paychecks may look like this;  $300 to the brokerage, $50 to the company, and $260 to the team.  That potentially leaves $390 to the Buyer’s Agent before taxes.

Now, do you think a listing agent is going to extensively market your home, do open houses every weekend like you want them to do, and contribute ample time and money to your home for $390?  If so, they won’t be in the business for long because they won’t be able to put food on their table.  It is more likely that this will be the agent who puts a sign in your yard, places the listing on the MLS, and sits back waiting to get paid.

What if we do a For Sale By Owner instead?  Click the chart to read over statistics provided by the National Association of Realtors, and enough said:  FSBO Stats

Seller’s Agent Expenses. So dang, those agents make a lot of money, right?  Hold your horses!  On top of our split, we have all of these additional expenses and then some:

  • Various taxes
  • Office fees
  • Office supplies
  • Realtracs subscriber fees
  • Advertising (signs, websites, business cards, etc)
  • Clarksville Assocation of Realtors dues
  • Tennessee Association of Realtors dues
  • National Association of Realtors dues
  • Dues for other professional organizations we may belong to
  • Listing services (virtual tours, staging, professional pictures, home inspections, etc)
  • Electronics (computers, cameras, etc)
  • Phone bills
  • Vehicle maintenance
  • And the worst of all… GAS (sometimes multiple times per week)!

Does that break it down for you?  Questions?  Concerns?

Be sure to read, Realtor Pay Exposed (Part 1 of 3): The Renter’s Agent and Realtor Pay Exposed (Part 2 of 3): The Buyer’s Agent.

If you have questions or need real estate assistance in the Clarksville, Tennessee or Fort Campbell, Kentucky area or know anyone who does, call me today at (931) 436-6765 or submit your information below.

© Ariel Anderson and https://buyorsellclarksvilletennesseehomes.wordpress.com, 2014.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ariel Anderson and https://buyorsellclarksvilletennesseehomes.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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In 1943, Abraham Maslow developed a psychological theory of basic human needs.  The foundation of the pyramid includes physiological requirements which among others include breathing, food, water, sleep and shelter.  The pyramid theorizes that the next level of human needs include bodily safety, health, and the security of property.  Having a place to call home is one of the most important motivators of human behavior and it is equally important to find the right person to guide you through the process.  Read on for tips to find the Realtor that is right for you!

Maslow

Word of mouth (or keyboard) is the best advertisement!  Ask your friends and family first.  Sometimes that is more difficult if you are being relocated to an area that is new and unfamiliar.  As a fellow military family, we have been in that situation more than a few times.  That is when social media can be your best friend.  Utilize Facebook and different public forums.  At Fort Campbell alone there are several different active Facebook pages to include PCSing ~ Relocating to Fort Campbell, KY ~ Clarksville, TN and Fort Campbell Wives Page.  Ask around!  Then once you get names of a couple of Realtors, ask if they have a couple of clients that wouldn’t mind speaking with you about their buying experience.  According to The 2012 National Association of Realtors® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers, “buyers most commonly choose an agent based on a referral, with trustworthiness and reputation being the most important factors.”

Visibility in the marketplace matters!  While you are getting recommendations and speaking to clients, check the Realtor’s visibility.  One of the fastest ways to do that is to run a Google search.  For example, search “Ariel Anderson” and see what comes up.  Try “Ariel Anderson Realtor” or “Ariel Anderson real estate”.  If you don’t get any results, that is no bueno and a good sign that the Realtor is not well-established in the community.  On the opposite end of the spectrum, if the Realtor is all over every billboard, shopping cart, and magazine that you see, chances are that you will be working with more than one person, or likely even a team.  Typically when working with a larger organization or team, you may have several different hands on documents, there may be longer waits for return phone calls, and that “home town” feeling might be missing.  Be cautious if someone entices you to use their services and then sends you on to another person, who may send you on to another.  You need to know who is on your side, and that you will not be lost in the shuffle.

What exactly do you do for a living?  Another good way to tell if a Realtor is right for you is to find out if they practice real estate full-time in this area.  According to the latest update, the Clarksville Association of Realtors has 703 active Realtors registered.  Not all of them practice full-time, and some of them may not even be in the area.  You want to make sure that whoever you are working with takes your quest for a home as seriously as you do.  They need to be directly involved in local real estate, knowledgeable of the area, and familiar with homes currently on the market.  If the Realtor is spread to thin and constantly distracted by other duties, you may not get the time and diligence needed.

You may also want to be sure that you aren’t being used as a referral.  There are some Realtors who make a living off of collecting referral fees.  They may tell you they are familiar with the area and have a lot of contacts that may be able to assist you.  They will get your personal information (name, phone number, email, etc), send it to a Realtor or team who is actually based locally, and then behind the scenes they collect a percentage of the commission that the Realtor they referred you to makes when you close on a home even when they did not personally do any work on the deal.  Make sure that the Realtor represents themselves honestly from the start, that the individual you speak to is here, and that they are willing to meet with you personally versus passing you off to someone else while collecting a fee.

Communication is key.  As I speak of in Tell me how this “buying a home” thing works?  A Guide

Make sure you feel like you can communicate with easily and that you are working with someone who will answer your phone calls, or return them at least.  Can you ask questions without being rushed?  Do they answer your questions or give you vague replies?  You want to make sure the individual is enthusiastic about their work and is confident with the process.  They need to be willing to explain things over and over again without getting frustrated, until you understand completely.

Do not drive around or search online, find a pretty home, and call the number on the sign.  The agent on the sign is the listing agent and works on behalf of the seller.  You see, with any real estate transaction, there are two sides; the selling side, and the buying side.  You want to find someone to represent you and your best interests!  There will be an Exclusive Buyer’s Representation Agreement which says that you agree to work with your realtor for a certain, mutually agreed upon, amount of time.  If you decide you do not like your realtor, once you have signed this agreement… if you go out and do the deal on your own… you may still be responsible for paying your realtor a commission, even if you did all the work on the side.  Make sure it is a good fit before you sign.  Read the fine print and remember that everything is negotiable until it is in writing!

Check your gut.  What does your instinct tell you?  Before signing a Buyer’s Representation Agreement, ask if the Realtor can show you a couple of homes.  Pay attention to the feelings that you get now so that you aren’t stuck in a binding agreement later with someone who is just isn’t a good fit.  As reported by The 2012 National Association of Realtors® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers, “Two out of thee buyers interviewed only one agent.  Eighty-nine percent of buyers are likely to use the same agent again or recommend to others.”  My personal recommendation is that you speak with a couple, unless you come across me first, and then look no further… You’ve found a Realtor on your side!

One more word to the wise;  Older and in the system longer does not necessarily mean better.  Sure experience is important!  They need to know the ropes, and understand the market.  But you also want someone who is eager, enthusiastic, and up to date with the market.  They need to be up to speed with the latest technology, social media, and community in general.  How cool is to find a realtor that utilizes text messaging, or Facebook?  Yeahhhhh, come on out of the stone ages!!

In conclusion, and back to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, buying a home and the people you choose to work with can affect many of your basic needs at some point along the way.  At the upper part of the pyramid you will see a need for friendship (love/belonging), respect by others (esteem), and problem-solving (self-actualization).  A great Realtor will not only help you with the most basic of needs, finding a safe shelter, but will also be a friend, will respect your choices and desires, all while helping you to problem solve through the process with your best interests at heart.

Pick Me!So if you are seeking real estate in the Clarksville, Tennessee or Fort Campbell, Kentucky area, pick me, pick me!  Call today or submit your information below so I can be your own personal Buyer Representative!

© Ariel Anderson and https://buyorsellclarksvilletennesseehomes.wordpress.com, 2013.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ariel Anderson and https://buyorsellclarksvilletennesseehomes.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.